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Eclipse Paths & Maps

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Solar Eclipse Paths & Maps: 2001 - 2020

The table below is a concise summary of all total, annular and hybrid solar eclipses from 2001 through 2020 (excluding partial eclipses). The links in the table provide additional information and graphics for each eclipse. In particular, the Eclipse Type (third column) links to dynamic maps showing the central path of eclipses across Earth's surface. These interactive maps utilize NASA eclipse path predictions and the plotting capabilities of Google Maps. The northern and southern limits of each eclipse path are plotted in blue while the central line is red. The yellow lines plotted across the path indicate the position of maximum eclipse at 10-minute intervals. You can zoom into the map and turn the satelite view on or off. When you click on a position, the eclipse times and circumstances at that location are calculated and displayed.

The first column in the table gives the Calendar Date of the instant of greatest eclipse[1]. This links to an orthographic projection map of Earth showing the region of visibility for an eclipse. The path of the Moon's penumbral shadow (cyan and magenta) covers the region of partial eclipse. The track of the umbral/antumbral shadow (blue/red) defines the path of total or annular eclipse. These figures are described in greater detail in the Key to Solar Eclipse Maps. Each figure is stored as a gif of approximately 60 kilobytes.

The second column TD of Greatest Eclipse is the Terrestrial Dynamical Time when the axis of the Moon's shadow passes closest to Earth's center. Animations of the Moon's penumbral and umbral shadows across Earth are accessed by clicking the this link. Each animated GIF file is from 40 KB to 175 KB in size.

The Eclipse Type (column 3) is either Total, Annular or Hybrid[2]. The link opens a window with the central eclipse path plotted on an interactive Google Map.

The Central Eclipse Class (column 4) indicates whether an eclipse is central or non-central. The parameters N and S identify paths that have no northern or southern limit, respectively. The link opens a table containing the central path coordinates.

Eclipses recur over the Saros cycle, a period of approximately 18 years 11 days. The Saros series that an eclipse belongs to is found in column 5. All eclipses in a particular Saros series can be viewed in a table via the Saros number link.

The parameter Gamma (column 6) is the perpendicular distance of the Moon's shadow axis and Earth's center at greatest eclipse. The link opens a table containing the Besselian elements for the eclipse.

The Eclipse Magnitude[3] (column 7) gives the fraction of the Sun's diameter obscured at the instant of greatest eclipse. The Path Width (column 8) gives the width of the central eclipse path (in kilometers) at the instant of greatest eclipse. The Central Duration[4] (column 9) gives the length of the eclipse as seen from the central line at greatest eclipse.

The Key to Solar Eclipse Path Tables contains a more detailed description of each item in the table.

For more data on solar eclipses during this period, see Catalog of Solar Eclipses: 1901 to 2000.

Solar Eclipse Paths: 2001 - 2020
Calendar Date TD of Greatest Eclipse Eclipse Type Central Eclipse Class Saros Series Gamma Eclipse Magnitude Path Width (km) Central Duration
(Link to Global Map) (Link to Animation) (Link to Google Map) (Link to Path Table) (Link to Saros) (Link to Besselian Elements)
2001 Jun 21 12:04:46 Total central 127 -0.5701 1.0495 200.0 04m57s
2001 Dec 14 20:53:01 Annular central 132 0.4089 0.9681 125.6 03m53s
2002 Jun 10 23:45:22 Annular central 137 0.1993 0.9962 13.5 00m23s
2002 Dec 04 07:32:16 Total central 142 -0.3020 1.0244 87.0 02m04s
2003 May 31 04:09:22 Annular central (N) 147 0.9960 0.9384 - 03m37s
2003 Nov 23 22:50:22 Total central 152 -0.9638 1.0379 495.5 01m57s
2005 Apr 08 20:36:51 Hybrid central 129 -0.3473 1.0074 27.0 00m42s
2005 Oct 03 10:32:47 Annular central 134 0.3306 0.9576 162.2 04m32s
2006 Mar 29 10:12:23 Total central 139 0.3843 1.0515 183.5 04m07s
2006 Sep 22 11:41:16 Annular central 144 -0.4062 0.9352 261.0 07m09s
2008 Feb 07 03:56:10 Annular central 121 -0.9570 0.9650 444.5 02m12s
2008 Aug 01 10:22:12 Total central 126 0.8307 1.0394 236.9 02m27s
2009 Jan 26 07:59:45 Annular central 131 -0.2820 0.9282 280.2 07m54s
2009 Jul 22 02:36:25 Total central 136 0.0698 1.0799 258.5 06m39s
2010 Jan 15 07:07:39 Annular central 141 0.4002 0.9190 333.1 11m08s
2010 Jul 11 19:34:38 Total central 146 -0.6788 1.0580 258.6 05m20s
2012 May 20 23:53:54 Annular central 128 0.4828 0.9439 236.9 05m46s
2012 Nov 13 22:12:55 Total central 133 -0.3719 1.0500 179.0 04m02s
2013 May 10 00:26:20 Annular central 138 -0.2694 0.9544 172.6 06m03s
2013 Nov 03 12:47:36 Hybrid central (AT) 143 0.3272 1.0159 57.5 01m40s
2014 Apr 29 06:04:33 Annular non-central (S) 148 -1.0000 0.9868 - -
2015 Mar 20 09:46:47 Total central 120 0.9454 1.0445 462.5 02m47s
2016 Mar 09 01:58:19 Total central 130 0.2609 1.0450 155.1 04m09s
2016 Sep 01 09:08:02 Annular central 135 -0.3330 0.9736 99.7 03m06s
2017 Feb 26 14:54:33 Annular central 140 -0.4578 0.9922 30.6 00m44s
2017 Aug 21 18:26:40 Total central 145 0.4367 1.0306 114.7 02m40s
2019 Jul 02 19:24:07 Total central 127 -0.6466 1.0459 200.6 04m33s
2019 Dec 26 05:18:53 Annular central 132 0.4135 0.9701 117.9 03m40s
2020 Jun 21 06:41:15 Annular central 137 0.1209 0.9940 21.2 00m38s
2020 Dec 14 16:14:39 Total central 142 -0.2939 1.0254 90.2 02m10s

Central Eclipse Class abbreviations (used above):
N = no northern limit, S = no southern limit, AT = annular-total hybrid, TA = total-annular hybrid


[1] Greatest Eclipse is the instant when the distance between the Moon's shadow axis and Earth's center reaches a minimum.

[2] Hybrid eclipses are also known as annular/total eclipses. Such an eclipse is both total and annular along different sections of its umbral path.

[3] Eclipse magnitude is the fraction of the Sun's diameter obscured by the Moon. For annular eclipses, the eclipse magnitude is always less than 1. For total eclipses, the eclipse magnitude is always greater than or equal to 1. For both annular and total eclipses, the value listed is actually the ratio of diameters between the Moon and the Sun.

[4] Central Duration is the duration of a total or annular eclipse at greatest eclipse. This is the instant when the axis of the Moon's shadow passes closest to Earth's center.


Twenty Year Solar Eclipse Path Tables (w/Google Maps)

Each of the following links displays a table containing 20 years of total, annular and hybrid eclipses. Each eclipse offers links to a global map, shadow animation, interactive Google map, path coordinates table, and saros table.

Twenty Year Solar Eclipse Path Tables (w/Google Maps)
Years
1901-1920 1921-1940 1941-1960 1961-1980 1981-2000
2001-2020 2021-2040 2041-2060 2061-2080 2081-2100

Decade Tables of Solar Eclipses

Each link in the following table displays a page containing 10 years of eclipses. Every eclipse has links of global maps, interactive Google maps, animations, path coordinate tables, and saros tables.

Decade Tables of Solar Eclipses
Decades
1901-1910 1911-1920 1921-1930 1931-1940 1941-1950
1951-1960 1961-1970 1971-1980 1981-1990 1991-2000
2001-2010 2011-2020 2021-2030 2031-2040 2041-2050
2051-2060 2061-2070 2071-2080 2081-2090 2091-2100

Maps of Solar Eclipse Paths

Solar Eclipse Catalogs

Reproduction of Eclipse Data

All eclipse calculations are by Fred Espenak, and he assumes full responsibility for their accuracy. Some of the information presented on this web site is based on data originally published in:

Fifty Year Canon of Solar Eclipses: 1986 - 2035
and
Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

Permission is freely granted to reproduce this data when accompanied by an acknowledgment:

"Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA's GSFC"

For more information, see: NASA Copyright Information